When I started my web site I planned to just show my pictures and keep myself in the background. I don’t really want to talk about myself,  and what have I got to say anyway?  Well, now that I think of it--plenty. I’ve worked at my art for more than thirty years.  I’ve taught art for fifteen years to children age 4 through the high school years. I’ve  served on the board of an art school for twelve years, evaluating scholarship applications and giving portfolio advice.  I’ve been married to the same man for almost 35 years.   I’ve raised two children who are now independent, self-supporting adults who call home regularly.  I have a dog and a cat.  I live in Greenwich Village on the border of the once funky now chic Meat Packing District.  I re-decorate and entertain frequently.  Now that I think of it I even have house-keeping tips.   I have plenty to write about.

I’m a native New Yorker who took some time out to live in Vermont. Moving from suburban New York to a little ski town for my last 2 years of high school was like dying and going to heaven. Those mountains! Those winding country roads with the covered bridges! Those little towns with the white steeples! I spent those years just looking around me and day dreaming.  My first paintings were of winding country roads, red barns and maple trees.

When people ask me  how I got interested in ART  I say I never got uninterested. I was always the kid who drew kittens on my math papers. In college a friend showed me her rapidograph, a drafting pen. When I saw the fine lines she could make with it, a light went on for me.  I could cover a page with textures, get lost in the rhythm of the process and make an interesting picture, even though my draughtsmanship wasn’t great.

I dropped out of college and moved to the big city, got a job, and took classes at night at the Art Students League. A teacher saw my pen drawings and said, “You must try etching!” Etching is a world unto itself, with metal plates, acids, solvents, and big machinery. My teacher, Roberto DeLaMonica, taught us his methods from absolute scratch so that “You could go anywhere in the world and make an etching." I still have his 10 page set of instructions;  one of the recipes said, “Don’t let this come to a boil -- it will explode.”

Printmaking is a great discipline, but I eventually simplified my life by returning to pen and ink--this time with a dip pen. All the work on this site is done with an old-fashioned dip pen on paper. And yes, I do make each little dot and line. And I day dream while I do it. Each of my pictures has a story, because as I draw my mind travels far and wide.  I’ll be telling those stories and I hope you’ll come back and let me share them with you.

As I write this, I see that at every crossroad in my life there’s been a friend holding out a helping hand or pointing to the next step for me. As Emily Dickinson said, “My friends are my estate.”  I’ll  be writing about my friends--both the ones I’ve actually met and those I’ve met in books, in art galleries, and the sports pages--everyone who has inspired me in so many different ways.